ore

ORE (2011) was a site-specific dance that dealt with the value systems placed upon nature and on the body. As miners, geological surveyors, auctioneers, and sleep walkers, dancers explored how to assign worth to rocks, sand, arroyo walls, and also to hands, legs, and wingspans. The dance communicated the deep satisfaction of adventure, counting, and systematic specificity, as well as the calm that comes from present being in time and space.  

 

ORE began with counting everything. One dancer auctioned off rocks from the arroyo floor, then her own hand, to the audience equipped with auction paddles. Other dancers covered themselves in mud only to shame each other for making such a mess.  In the end a temple of rocks is built to protect two sleeping bodies. 

How can we trouble and resist the value systems assigned to body and land?

  • PERFORMANCE by Miles Tokunow, Paolo Speirn, Áine McCarthy, Sarah Ashkin

  • MUSIC by Adam Gunther

  • SCULPTURE INSTALLATION, DOCUMENTATION & DRAMATURGY by Eric Bissell

  • CREATED FOR/WITH the Santa Fe River arroyo, Santa Fe, NM

ORE collaborator bios 

ÁINE McCARTHY is a buddhist chaplain, dance maker, writer, and yoga teacher.  She is the director of Chrysalis New Mexico, an organization that provides contemplative and creative programming to inspire women's self-reflection and growth. https://chrysalisnewmexico.org/

 

ADAM GUNTHER is a composer and producer based in Los Angeles, CA. With experience in pop production, multi-media theater and experimental composition, Gunther brings a modern aesthetic and dramaturgy to his work.  His work has appeared in The New York Times op-doc series, The Atlantic magazine's Atlantic Selects series, the Tate Modern and Nowness.com, to name a few. He has been collaborating with Sarah Ashkin and GROUND SERIES since 2008.  https://www.adamgunther.com/


ERIC BISSELL is a photographer and rock climber based in Bishop, CA.  https://www.instagram.com/ericbissell/

land acknowledgement

ORE was created for and on unceded Tewa Territory.  As a work dealing with extraction and the commodification of land and body, we honor the Tewa peoples’ model of stewardship and right relation to this land.